In the Market for a Secondary Property? Check out this Guide for all you need to know!

General Aman Gill 18 Sep

The Ultimate Guide to Secondary Properties

All the key tips to buying, using, and even renting out a vacation home
By Dominion Lending Centres Sep 9, 2020

So, you are looking to purchase a second property! Congratulations! This is an incredible opportunity and we are here to help provide you with the keys to success to expand your financial portfolio and ensure stability for the future.

Before you launch into this purchase there are a few things you should know, depending on which type of second property you are looking to purchase.

 

Purchasing a Second Property

When it comes to considering additional investments, most people don’t look at secondary properties. Why? Generally, people are trained to stay out of debt. As a result, they don’t tend to consider using the equity in their home to buy an investment property, but it all comes down to the art of leveraging.

In the case of purchasing a secondary property, most lenders will allow you to borrow money against the equity you have in your current home and use it as a down payment for a second home. Before jumping in, it is important to understand the different financing options to determine which route best suits your circumstances and property goals.

Refinancing Your Home

One option for tapping into your home equity for the purpose of purchasing a secondary property is to refinance your mortgage. Essentially, mortgage refinancing means getting a reevaluation on your home and then redoing your mortgage based on the current value. This will allow you to tap into the equity your home has built over the years, and pull out the extra funds for a down payment on your secondary property.

Keep in mind, when using some of your current equity, it will increase the principal amount and the interest payments on your mortgage as the mortgage is now refinanced at a higher amount.

 

Using a HELOC

There is a second option to unlock your home equity, which is through a line of credit or a HELOC, which stands for “Home Equity Line of Credit”. This option allows you to borrow money using the equity in your property, with the property as collateral.

A HELOC serves as a revolving line of credit to allow the borrower to access funds, as needed, letting you utilize as much (or as little) equity as required. Another benefit to this is that you will only pay interest on the amount you actually use. This can provide financial breathing room, especially during tight months. That said, if you do choose to pay the interest as well as a portion towards the principle, it can help you pay off the loan much faster.

You can utilize a HELOC in two ways:

1)    You can tie it to your existing mortgage

2)    You can apply for a HELOC separate from your mortgage

In Canada, you are able to borrow up to 65% of your home’s value using this method. However, keep in mind, your HELOC balance AND current outstanding mortgage cannot exceed 80% of your home’s value when added together.

 

Types of Secondary Properties

When it comes to secondary properties, there are multiple uses for them such as purchasing a vacation home, or using a second property for the intention of earning rental income. Depending on which purpose you are considering, there are different requirements to keep in mind.

 

Vacation Properties

Whenever people hear “vacation property”, you automatically assume these are only for the super-rich but that is simply not true! Vacation properties can be possible for anyone and are a great option for those who want to get away from it all!

If you’re inclined to head down that road, buying a vacation property is essentially like purchasing a second home. The minimum down payment remains 5% of the purchase price and will require the same processes as your first mortgage. If you are purchasing a non-winterized vacation home, or will not have year-round access, then you will be required to put down 10%.

It is also important to note that if you plan to use your vacation home to provide rental income as this will have different requirements as noted below.

 

Second Property with Intention to Rent

If you are purchasing a secondary property – whether a vacation home or investment property – there are a few differences if the intention is to rent.

Before you look at purchasing a rental property, there are a few things to consider:

  1. The minimum down payment required is 20% of the purchase price, and the funds must come from your own savings; you cannot use a gift from someone else.
  2. Only a portion of the rental income can be used for the qualifying and determining how much of a mortgage you can afford to borrow. Some lenders will only allow you to use 50% of the income added to yours, while other lenders may allow up to 80% of the rental income while subtracting your expenses. This can have a much higher impact on how much you can afford.
  3. Interest rates usually have a premium on them when the mortgage is for a rental property versus a mortgage for a home someone intends on living in. The premium can be anywhere from 0.10% to 0.20% on a regular 5-year fixed rate.

Rental income from the property can be used to debt service the mortgage application, but do bear in mind that some lenders will have a minimum liquid net worth requirement outside of the property. Also, if you do eventually want to sell this property, do note that it will be subject to capital gains tax. Your accountant will be able to help you with that aspect if you do decide to sell in the future.

 

Who Can Qualify?

You might be surprised to learn that you don’t need to be one of the uber rich or make six figures to have a second property. You just need to have knowledge, determination and financial planning.

When it comes to purchasing a secondary property, whether for investment or rental or vacation, it can be a great opportunity! Before taking on a secondary property, you will need to have your down payment in order (whether from savings or home equity) based on the minimum requirements, and also have sufficient credit score to qualify (680 or higher).

In addition to the down payment, you will also need to pass the stress-test and prove that you can financially carry both mortgages. Also keep in mind any barriers with lenders as most will limit the number of mortgages in a portfolio. If this is only property number two or three, you won’t have any concerns, but as you expand your portfolio you may run into limits at five properties (at which point you would be considered a commercial file).

Before you jump into the purchase of a secondary property, consult with a Dominion Lending Centres mortgage professional. They can help review your financial situation, current mortgage and equity, and help you make a plan. The keys to success are right around the corner with a little bit of expert advice!

Home Ownership likely one of our biggest investments.

General Aman Gill 17 Jun

Home Ownership for most of us will be the biggest investment we make in our lives, there are many important factors to consider before you take the next step. This is a great quick read for anyone looking at purchasing a new home, contact me, your trusted professional mortgage advisor to discuss any questions you might have!
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CMHC Tightening Mortgage Qualifications!

General Aman Gill 7 Jun

 

CMHC MAKES IT HARDER TO QUALIFY FOR AN INSURED MORTGAGE

CMHC Makes It Harder To Qualify For An Insured Mortgage

Once again, the Canadian Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) is tightening the criteria to get a mortgage with less than a 20% down payment. Any potential home buyer with less than a 20% down payment must purchase default insurance on their loan and have a minimum down payment of 5%. CMHC is a federal Crown Corporation that provides such default insurance. Its mandate is to help Canadians access affordable housing options. Providing mortgage insurance to home buyers is one of its main activities. Mortgage default insurance protects lenders in the event a borrower ever stopped making payments and defaulted on their mortgage loan–a very infrequent occurrence in Canada.

There are private providers of default insurance as well–Genworth Financial Canada and Canada Guaranty. CMHC is the only insurer of mortgages for multi-unit residential properties, including large rental buildings, student housing and nursing and retirement homes. It is the largest provider of mortgage default insurance by far and is also the primary insurer for housing in small and rural communities.

Investment properties are not eligible for mortgage insurance. Because of this, the buyer needs at least a 20% down payment to buy an investment property. Homes costing more than $1 million, as well, are not eligible for mortgage insurance. Typically, the lender chooses the mortgage insurer.

Why is CMHC Tightening Qualifications?

The economics team at CMHC has predicted that owing to the pandemic lock down, home prices will likely fall by 9% to 18% over the next 12 months. They also believe that it will take at least two years for prices to return to pre-pandemic levels. The CMHC forecast for the economy is more pessimistic than many other forecasts, particularly that of the Bank of Canada, which asserted yesterday that the outlook for the economy was better than their April forecast suggested. Moreover, CMHC acknowledges the high degree of uncertainty associated with any forecast at this time. The Crown Corporation highlights the post-shutdown job losses, business closures and the drop in immigration that adversely affect Canadian housing.

They also have emphasized the 15% of existing mortgages that are now in deferral and believe there is a risk that 20% of all mortgages could be in arrears when deferrals end. Their stated justification for tightening qualification requirements is “to protect future home buyers and reduce risk“.

What Are These Changes In Underwriting Policies

Effective July 1, the following changes will apply for new applications for homeowner transactional and portfolio mortgage insurance:

  • The maximum gross debt service (GDS) ratio drops from 39 to 35
  • The maximum total debt service (TDS) ratio drops from 44 to 42
  • The minimum credit score rises from 600 to 680 for at least one borrower
  • Non-traditional sources of down payment that increase indebtedness will no longer be treated as equity for insurance purposes

CMHC goes on to say that “to further manage the risk to our insurance business, and ultimately taxpayers, during this uncertain time, we have also suspended refinancing for multi-unit mortgage insurance except when the funds are used for repairs or reinvestment in housing. Consultations have begun on the repositioning of our multi-unit mortgage insurance products.”

Here’s What We Know So Far

Anecdotal reports suggest that it is likely that private default insurers will not match CMHC’s lower debt ratios. They might, however, be more selective in their approval processes.

Canadian fiscal and monetary authorities are expending huge sums to keep the economy afloat, cushion the blow of the shutdown, and to make sure ample credit is available. These actions are intended to minimize unnecessary insolvencies. It is, therefore, surprising that a federal Crown Corporation would take these pro-cyclical actions now.

The exact impact of these changes will not be known until more details are available: How the Big Banks will respond with their own prime mortgage underwriting rules; how these new rules will apply to the securitization market; and how far the private default insurers will go along with these new rules.

Suffice it to say that this batters buyer and seller confidence and, all other things equal, has a net negative impact on the near-term housing outlook.  Most importantly, in my view, these changes are unnecessary to protect the prudence of Canada’s home lending practices. Mortgage delinquency rates are meager, and even the Bank of Canada’s forecast is for delinquencies to remain less than 1% of all outstanding mortgages. Moreover, home buyers with jobs who meet former qualifications would undoubtedly have a longer than two-year time horizon when buying their first homes. They were already qualifying at the posted rate that is more than 250 basis points above the contract rate. If anything, the pandemic recession assures that interest rates will remain very low over the next two years.